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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 2 The Importance of Time Phases in Disaster Response Evaluations. Note. Shown here is that disaster response evaluations might generate different results at different moments in the timeline of a disaster. The ribbon crossing the centre of the image is inspired by the disaster stages model by Raphael (1986). It highlights an increase in wellbeing and social support, then a decrease followed by a recovery with drawbacks. In this model it illustrates how information to assess effects can be collected before the event or the moment of impact (T0), in a climate of compassion, understanding and support for the people affected (T1), in a phase of disillusionment, frustration, anger and grief (T2), at a time when people are crawling up (T3), and when they regained control over their lives and the impact of the event (T4). It is problematic to include information from different phases (or to combine measurements from two or more phases) in an evaluation without considering the different contexts.

Figure 2 The Importance of Time Phases in Disaster Response Evaluation<i>s.</i> Note. Shown here is that disaster response evaluations might generate different results at different moments in the timeline of a disaster. The ribbon crossing the centre of the image is inspired by the disaster stages model by Raphael (1986). It highlights an increase in wellbeing and social support, then a decrease followed by a recovery with drawbacks. In this model it illustrates how information to assess effects can be collected before the event or the moment of impact (T0), in a climate of compassion, understanding and support for the people affected (T1), in a phase of disillusionment, frustration, anger and grief (T2), at a time when people are crawling up (T3), and when they regained control over their lives and the impact of the event (T4). It is problematic to include information from different phases (or to combine measurements from two or more phases) in an evaluation without considering the different contexts.